Friday, 12 March 2010

Bobbins

Drawing was the process by which the combed 'tops' were gradually reduced from thick slivers of wool to a 'roving' from which yarn could be spun. The wool passed through a series of machines with rollers, each designed to play its part in the gradual drawing-out process. You can see the difference in the thickness of the wool between yesterday's top balls and the bobbins in this picture. To give some idea of scale, each of these bobbins is about a foot (30cm) high. (Isn't 'bobbins' a lovely word..?) But the wool is still way too thick for weaving and has no twist to make it strong.

Now then, as a matter of photographic interest - my original photo that I was going to use was the one below. But on my photography course this week, we were looking at the effect of 'line' on a photo - and seeing how much more dynamic images are with diagonals or curves, and how it can alter the mood. So I did some experimenting with this photo, cropping and rotating it, and trying to bring out the texture of the wool a bit more. I think it perhaps makes a more interesting visual image, though in a history context the original gives a bit more information. What do you think? I'm seeking to learn and develop as a photographer, so all comments gratefully received.

I'm a day late for the themed tribute day for Paris Daily Photo, the blog that 'started' the daily photo blogs 5 years ago. It's not a blog that I've followed up til now, but apparently Eric Tenin, its author, often uses images at odd angles - so I'm on trend! Anyway, congratulations to the man for a great idea and some dedicated blogging.

7 comments:

  1. Oh that took me back. My father started his working life as a bobbin-ligger in a mill in Bradford and I am sure that my mother once told me she used to work on a roving machine. As for the photographs, the first one is certainly visually more appealing whilst the second is more informative. The lesson, of course, use both.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love the top photo -- art, not just information!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I like them both. Although the first one is more visually appealing, it does require more explanation. Those are the biggest bobbins I have ever seen!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Alan - were they really called bobbin-liggers? - how wonderful! My dad always used to tell me that there was a job in the Staffordshire Potteries called a 'sagger-maker's bottom-knocker" - but I was never sure if he was just having me on...

    ReplyDelete
  5. I too prefer the top image. It's just so pretty! And it satisfies my need to see things up close. Enjoyed seeing the woolen mill series...I love wool! ~Lili

    ReplyDelete
  6. I'll throw in my tu'pence worth.
    I think the 'tilting' is a great device, but probably works best when done 'in camera' at the time of taking the shot. I say that because when I have used the software to do that I have noticed two things; 1. you lose some of the original shot as the tilting crops the shot and the more you tilt the more you lose.2. The 'tilted' shot tends to lose some of the fine definition because of the way the software does the tilting.
    I think the second shot would make a good subject for rendering in black & white; in photoshop I would increase the exposure a little so that the yarns don't go grey in monochrome, and increase the contrast a bit in photoshop. That isn't needed in the colour shot, but would be effective in monochrome. There you go, it's 'mouthy' me again.

    ReplyDelete
  7. John - you're right about the tilting. I'm only just beginning to see the possibilities of taking a different viewpoint when I'm out with my camera. I will have a go with mono on the second shot, see what it looks like. It's largely you that has got me onto monochrome - didn't really do any, until I saw some of your terrific B&W images.

    ReplyDelete

No WV here but I've enabled comment moderation on older posts so I don't miss any of your messages. I love reading them - thank you! And thanks for visiting my blog.