Thursday, 9 September 2010

Dent village

Dentdale is about 10 miles long. Early Norse settlers preferred to live in scattered homesteads throughout the valley and, perhaps as a result, there is only the one small village of Dent and a few little hamlets in the dale. The village of Dent sits above the River Dee, and the oldest part of the village - shown here - around the Norman church, has very narrow cobbled streets and is quite picturesque. The large stone you can see at the corner of the house in the distance is actually a drinking fountain and commemorates Adam Sedgwick (1785-1873), known as the father of modern geology, who was born in Dent, son of the local Anglican vicar. The Dent area also has a strong Quaker tradition.

I'm putting more photos of Dent and Dentdale on my other blog.

11 comments:

  1. Even the smallest village has its local hero! what a lovely place! and so english!

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  2. Beautiful photograph. The village seems almost perfect, as though they dust the doors and polish the cobbles each morning.

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  3. The little station at Dent featured in one of the episodes of Michael Portillo's series of train journeys around England.

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  4. It is interesting how they maintained the older homes, I like a window on the left that has two designs to accomadate the opening.The fountain is very unique also.

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  5. beautiful texture and composition!

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  6. O Dent is a lovely village - last time we were there I think the river was running down the middle of part of the main street.

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  7. So historic and picturesque. Lovely!

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  8. This place looks great to explore and photograph!

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