Wednesday, 5 January 2011

Heritage Trail 3 - Saltaire's United Reformed Church


'Continue downhill along Victoria Road, passing the impressive Saltaire United Reformed Church on the left...'  I have posted many photos of this beautiful and unusual building (click the 'Saltaire URC' label to see more - both inside and outside) - but for completeness as we 'walk' the Heritage Trail I'm posting another one. I never get tired of looking at it anyway, as it's such an iconic building.

Originally the Congregational Church, it was completed in 1859.  Sir Titus Salt, Saltaire's founder, was a staunch Christian and was anxious to provide spiritually as well as materially for his employees.  The church was in many ways the crowning glory of his paternalistic vision for a township that would provide all that his workers in the vast textile mill, and their families, could need. (As well as a last resting place for himself and his family, in the adjoining Mausoleum.)

Situated directly opposite the main entrance to Salts Mill, the church stands at the end of a long drive that focuses the visitor's attention on the magnificent entrance and tower.  To the right, you can just see the Stable Block cottages.

[No 2 on the street plan]

11 comments:

  1. Superb photo!

    Sir Titus Salt seems to have been a truly remarkable man.

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  2. I'm enjoying the walk, and am looking forward to seeing where it stops next. I've walked around here so many times, but it's nice to see it through fresh eyes.

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  3. A beautiful church Jenny.
    And your B&W photograph makes it more so.
    Costas

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  4. I remember this one. I'm getting to know Saltaire, thanks to you.

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  5. Yes great composition. A day out for the eyes.

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  6. It is a classic, flowing from the tall streetlight on the left, through the church to the fence and cobbles on the right. It looks good in blanck and white.

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  7. Iconic, indeed! A beautiful building!

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  8. How long is this walk? I'm really enjoying these b&w photos.

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  9. B&W images are always so intriguing to me. This is a wonderful example. ~Lili

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  10. T Becque - the real walk might take about an hour (depending on how many photos stops you make and how many coffees you consume along the way!) In photos, it's going to take us a lot longer - over two weeks! I hope you don't get bored.

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  11. PS: These are all new photos I have not posted before.

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