Friday, 12 October 2012

I've got my beady eye on you..


Also at Bolling Hall, Scott Maslin, the Head Falconer at Bradford Birds of Prey was showing some of the birds they have rescued and rehabilitated. BBoP are a conservation, rescue and educational organisation and it was very interesting to see these beautiful birds and to hear their stories. Yorkie (above) is a European Eagle owl that was rescued from a life of mistreatment and violent abuse. She had a broken wing and was deeply damaged psychologically, having been kept in a cat carrier. (She has a 5' wing span!) Patient rehabilitation has calmed her behaviour and strengthened her wing so that she may be able to fly again. (See here for her full story.)



Luna is a Common Buzzard, a magnificent bird. It was wonderful to see these handsome creatures so close up. They also had a Tawny owl and a sweet, sleepy-looking little owl, whose proper name I didn't catch. You could even stroke them; their feathers were so, so soft. What a privilege. I was enthralled.

12 comments:

  1. Just love thëse photos, such beautiful detail. Isn't Mother Nature wonderful?

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  2. I wasn't aware raptors were called buzzards in Europe. In North America, buzzard refers to a vulture. Once again, "divided by a common language."

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  3. I just love owls...I have only photographed one once in the wild, it flew to a tree right in front of my car. Amazing! Why would anyone want to abuse such a beautiful animal, it just makes no sense.

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  4. Two excellent portraits today, jennyfreckles. I had the same reaction as Wayfarin . . . the second bird doesn't look anything like the buzzards we have over here. I took some photos of a woman exhibiting rescued birds about ten days ago, but so far those photos have not risen to the top of my stack.

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  5. Yorkie is such a magnificent bird. Why people feel the need to confine animals like this in small cages is beyond me. How wonderful that she can now fly.

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  6. These are fabulous shots of these magnificent creatures. I always think of a buzzard as a vulture too.

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  7. What beautiful birds and how lucky for you to be so close and get such great shots. I cannot comprehend people being cruel to such beautiful creaturesj.

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  8. Gorgeous birds! I especially like the top shot.

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  9. Oh my goodness, these photographs made me gasp! They are so awe inspiring!

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  10. These photographs are really rather good. Thank you for taking the time to include information about the birds and what we do here. Please feel free to arrange a visit, during which you're welcome to photograph some of the other birds we have at present. Again, thank you. Scott @ Bradford Birds of Prey.

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  11. Thank you for showing off my lovely birds, and for your kind words about the work I do here. It is very much appreciated.

    I may be wrong, but my belief is that buzzards and vultures share a lot behavioural traits... they both soar, circling high on the thermals, when 'hunting' for food, they share a similar diet, although European buzzards will catch and kill, they are partial to a bit of carrion, and 80% of the buzzards I've rescued over the years, have preferred to walk, or 'bounce', rather than fly for food.

    On a buzzard note, Luna, our European Buzzard, will be moving on to a new home on Thursday 1st November. She has recieved all possible treatment she can from me and since growing her feathers back, is in need of a lot more space. She will now display to school and college students, before being included in a breeding program aimed at decreasing the number of wild birds still being caught and used in captivity.

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