Saturday, 30 March 2013

Revolution

30 March 2013 is an historic date.... It marks: the death of Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother (2002); the assassination attempt on Ronald Reagan (1981); an IRA bomb attack on the House of Commons (1979); the invasion of Austria by Russia (1945); the day the US bought Alaska (1867) and.....
the publication of this book: 'Britain's Industrial Revolution - the makings of a manufacturing people 1700-1870'. It's written by Barrie Trinder, writer, lecturer and consultant on industrial archaeology and social history. Cover photograph by jennyfreckles, amateur photographer and blogger!

Bearing in mind the recent musings on copyright, I have to quickly say that in this case the publisher (Carnegie Publishing) did everything perfectly properly and the photograph is used with my full consent. I'm actually really thrilled to see what a great job they have done with it, after they spotted a mono version on my blog (well, more likely on Google images in the first place).

This is not just a boast post (though it is that!) but I do think the book looks rather interesting for someone who, like me, is interested in Britain's social history. It explores the industrial revolution, one of the paradigm shifts in human history, which happened first in Britain. It changed forever the way in which goods were made: from small cottage industries, huge new factories and mills developed, using new inventions in machinery, new sources of power and new ways of transporting goods - our roads, railways and canals. New ways of working and living were needed: a concentrated workforce in rapidly growing towns and cities. It led to huge economic benefits, but it brought pollution, disfiguration of a green and pleasant country and increasing inequality between rich and poor. The industrial revolution created this country and the society we recognise today. What interests me too is that, though Britain and many other 'developed' countries are now in a post-industrial age (the death throes recorded by such as the photographer Ian Beesley, whose work I mentioned earlier this month), in other areas of the world (like China, India) the industrial revolution is still gaining pace. I'm not sure that the lessons we could have learned have been heeded....

9 comments:

  1. Really pleased for you, jennyfreckles! A momentous day and a tribute to your skill as a photographer.

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  2. Well well congratulations . How chuffed you must be. It is a great shot for the title of that book. It would be an interesting read especially for you living close to the Salt Mills. Your post is titled Revolution and mine is Revolting sort of.

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  3. And 13 march will become the day when we discovered that a fabulous amateur became a pro!How proud you must be! Congratulations, i'm so happy for you!

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  4. CONGRATULATIONS to you, Jenny!!! That is a gorgeous photo and I'm so happy it was chosen for this book - which sounds really fascinating, truly. BTW, my daughter and I were at Westminster Abbey for the memorial service for Queen Elizabeth - the 400th anniversary of her death.

    Have a blessed Resurrection Sunday, Jenny.

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  5. Really interesting info in this post.

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  6. Congrats Jenny. I hope they sent you a free copy!

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  7. Congratulations Jenny. Wonderful photo and I am sure a wonderful book. You deserve to have this cover...quite a marvelous photo for the subject. And you work so hard. Still saying prayers for you and your loss. Happy Easter. Gin

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  8. Congratulations..... great shot!

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  9. Hi Jenny - fantastic ... I hadn't spotted that image - I guess A-Z looming! Congratulations though .. and now I go back to today's post ... The power of the net ..... cheers Hilary

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