Tuesday, 14 May 2013

Put the kettle on, mother


The hamlet of Wycoller would be less attractive if it didn't have a tearoom and a little craft centre. Happily it does, housed in an old stone building, a converted shippon (a cowshed and dairy). Its centrepiece is this magnificent Victorian open range, of the type that would have been found in most homes at one time. The houses in Saltaire all had similar things, providing heat (and boy, was this one pumping out some heat!), cooking facilities and scope for heating water. You don't often see them now, and I have rarely seen one in full working condition. Isn't it wonderful? They were not using it to cook on though, I hasten to add.
Having taken the photo, I elected to take my drink outside into the garden to enjoy a relaxing time in the sunshine, topping up my Vitamin D.
(By the way, don't visit Wycoller on a Monday as the tearoom and shop is closed.)

8 comments:

  1. A fabulous sight for sore eyes!

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  2. My grandmother had one a little smaller in Sheffield; I remember her slaving away in the summer to get a full Sunday lunch on the table. It was so hot in there.

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  3. Oh my goodness. LOVE that stove. There was one similar in Askrigg at Crown Inn. Fascinating.

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  4. It is a very fancy cooking stove. I bet they filled it full of wood and lighted it not know that it would make it very hot in the building.

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  5. Wow ! that's a real beautiful one ! My grandma had something similar, I remember that it was white ! It's such a long time ago I think I was about 4 or 5 ! and yes it heated very well !

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  6. I NEVER see these things!

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