Tuesday, 12 August 2014

Waterwheel


One of the two huge waterwheels that drove the Thwaite Mills' machinery. Built in the 1820s by Thomas Hewes, they are 'low breast shot' which means the water is delivered to them roughly in line with their central axle (as opposed to being fed under or to the top of the wheel). They have iron frames, eighteen feet in diameter, and elm wood buckets. These wheels still operate and throughout the mill buildings there are elaborate systems of gearwheels, shafts, pulleys and belts, so that you can see and hear the moving parts all around you.

4 comments:

  1. Amazing technology from yesteryear.

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  2. wow...almost 200 years ago. Funny name. ha.

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  3. We just watched a "Time team" episode last night that was attempting to unearth a mill. Funny to see one here!

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  4. It is fun seeing this old machinery. The waterwheels that I can remember seeing in the USA are usually fed at the top or bottom, not at the center.

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