Wednesday, 10 May 2017

It's black over Bill's mother's



'It's black over Bill's mother's'' is a phrase you'll probably only understand if you're from the North of England or the Midlands. It's what people say when there are storm clouds visible on the horizon. The origin of the phrase appears to be doubtful. Some say it refers to William Shakespeare, others to Kaiser Wilhelm II, the last German emperor, whose character and foreign policy was changeable and blustering. Others say it has more local origins. But whatever the truth of the phrase, it is often apt round here!

Saltaire's houses are dwarfed by the huge bulk of the Victoria Hall which extends back in a T-shape behind its tower.

8 comments:

  1. Common enough down here too - both the saying and the rainclouds - though it's usually Will rather than Bill.

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  2. Nice to have local sayings!

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  3. Aw...I haven't heard that one (living here in Coventry). Like it. Beautiful photo.

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  4. An interesting phrase! Thanks for explaining it. Those buildings are lovely.

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  5. Why do the terrace house owners brick up their windows when during a Yorkshire winter daylight is so scarce?

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  6. Not that we get that weather all that often Jenny but I am so going to remember that expression, just to see the puzzled look on faces when I say it 😀😀

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  7. The skies add a lot to the image.

    Sorry I have not been visiting much. Life has become a bit complicated.

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