Sunday, 23 January 2011

Heritage Trail 19 - Victoria Hall


Back on our virtual walk round the World Heritage Site of Saltaire, walking down Victoria Road:
'You will soon reach two of the finest buildings in Saltaire - the School on the left and the Institute on the right'   I have shown several photos of The Saltaire Club and Institute, now known as the Victoria Hall, on my blog before - click the 'Victoria Hall' label for other views.  It's a solid building, but beautiful in its own way, being pleasingly symmetrical and with some attractive stonework.  It was designed by Saltaire's architects, Lockwood and Mawson, commissioned by Sir Titus Salt to provide a social club and educational institute for adults.  When it opened in 1871, it had amazing facilities including a library, laboratory, billiard room, lecture halls, a gym and a rifle drill room (used by the 39th West Riding Rifle Volunteers).  Even today it continues to be a well-used local facility (though karate has replaced rifle drill!)

The post box, one of two in Saltaire, has a plain GR cipher which relates to King George V (reigned 1910-1936).  Apparently he chose not to have the V included in the cipher.  The box is very tatty and could do with a coat of paint!

[No 6 on street plan]

9 comments:

  1. Good morning, Jenny :) I hope you're having a good weekend, not too cold. Wondering what plans you have up your sleeve for when this walking tour of yours has come to an end...I, for one, will miss these daily outings! It really has been a lot of fun.

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  2. I watched the Michael Portillo Great Britain's railway programme on friday via BBC i player on his Saltaire stop in his themed journey from Newcastle to Melton Mowbray. It was a revelation to me about the background of Titus Salt. It has given me a greater understanding of your blog page now.

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  3. Once more, congratulations for sir Titus, who had understood before everyone that people also need entertainment!The more I read about him, the more I admire him! The Hall is really beautyful(I like symetrie in architecture!) and I also like mail boxes!A simple thing, but rich in history , for the one who nows how to read it!

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  4. This is a very substantial and sturdy building. It anchors the location well.

    Re your question today, these plates were made in your country, near Stoke-on-Trent, in the period 1815 - 1830. England sent painters over to the USA to record the scenes, primarily new public buildings. Then, print makers made prints and put them in books, and the potters copied the prints. This is called "transferware," because it was mass production using a decal-like transfer process.

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  5. I like the post box in the foreground and the way the building slants away.

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  6. Funnily enough, the first thing I looked at on your photograph was the monarch of the post box. Ever since I did my own post on the GR pillar box, I've become obsessed with them! Sad, isn't it!

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  7. That is a cool mailbox and I love the look of that school. Great design.

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  8. I was thinking how cool your mail boxes look over there. I must like tatty! LOL ~Lili

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  9. He thought of everything. Way ahead of his time.

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No WV here but I've enabled comment moderation on older posts so I don't miss any of your messages. I love reading them - thank you! And thanks for visiting my blog.