Friday, 30 March 2012

Mughal reflection


Bradford's Lister Park (where the Sport Relief Mile took place - see yesterday) was looking at its best last weekend in the spring sunshine.  Its centrepiece is Cartwright Hall, the city's municipal art gallery, built in 1904. Unlike some civic art galleries, I believe it was designed as a gallery rather than a grand house.  The park was once a deer park belonging to the Lister family, another of Bradford's textile dynasties.  The gallery has an interesting permanent collection which brings together works of art from many different cultures and periods and is carefully designed to be inclusive to the diverse ethnic groups represented in this very multi-cultural city.  The hall and the park have had a lot of money spent on them in recent years and have been transformed into a very attractive destination for an afternoon out.

My picture shows Cartwright Hall reflected in one of the pools in the Mughal Water Gardens, a synthesis of Islamic and Hindu architectural styles, forming a symmetrical series of canals, pools, planted and paved areas.  The Garden is intended to reflect the cultural heritage of the immediate area surrounding the park, where the Victorian terraces and villas (where Titus Salt and his ilk once lived) are now home to a large British Asian community.


I'm linking this to the 'Weekend Reflections' theme this week.  Please have a look at the other entries here, hosted by James.  There are always some great photos from all over the world.

14 comments:

  1. A wonderful looking place and well captured at a quiet moment.

    Chrissy from Manchester: a photo a day at Mancunian Wave

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  2. I've not been to Lister Park for years and years. Your post has inspired me to make a return visit.

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  3. I do love the watery, colorful reflection and it does indeed look like a quiet, peaceful moment. Hope you have a lovely weekend, Jenny!

    Sylvia

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  4. This looks to be a gorgeous locale. I love how the reflection is framed in the shape of the water feature. Nicely seen and captured.

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  5. This "pool" offers a very beautyful frame to the reflection, like an echo of the beauty of the building.

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  6. Such pretty architecture and you've captured it from a great angle ...Bravo!

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  7. nice reflection in an interesting place. :)

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  8. The narrow canals of the water garden make an interesting feature.

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  9. Nice shot and an interesting incite into the effect of multi cultures living there. That seems to happen in many towns how an area gets taken over by a different cultural group.There was an interesting children's book written about Redfern a poor socio-economic inner city suburb of Sydney. It traced the history in pictures of the different kids who had lived in the streets. It started with the aborigines who lived there first ,then the first English people usually from poor backgrounds or freed convicts, then the poor irish workers, then the immigrants from Greece and Italy, then Arab migrants and now it has gone back to poor urban aboriginese.

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  10. Well seen and captured, jennyfreckles! Both the grand art gallery and the pool (or rather the brick/tile (?) work around it) look worth a visit.

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  11. Wonderful architecture and a great perspective Jenny. Thanks for sharing.

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