Wednesday, 22 February 2017

Snowdrop varieties



At first glance one snowdrop (Galanthus) looks much like another, but closer inspection reveals the differences between the varieties. It is not a species native to Britain. Some say bulbs were brought over by the Romans from Europe and the Middle East, and others that it was introduced in the 16th century. There are about 20 different species, some taller than others, some with simple flowers and others with double flowers. Species have been hybridised; there are known to be over 500 cultivars and there are some absolutely passionate collectors. The way the bulbs spread into drifts is most attractive and the flowers, naturalised in woodland or in garden borders, are such a welcome sign of early Spring.

10 comments:

  1. I have been out looking for them in my area but the new snow made that impossible.

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  2. Gorgeous Jenny. I love Snowdrops....as you may have noticed :0)
    Jacquie x

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  3. Oh, they are so pretty! Lovely photos!

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  4. I had no idea; they all look the same to me! But i should have guessed, i suppose. Lovely shots.

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  5. I like snowdrops a lot. As you said they are sign of spring. Now they are blossoming in Slovenia, too.

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  6. I find it difficult to photograph white flowers. Your images really look lovely.

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  7. I didn't know that. I was out looking for any sprouts this morning but nothing yet!

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  8. I have one shy snow drop blooming -- really would like some like these -- a little more showy!

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  9. Snowdrops and crocuses were the earliest signs of spring creeping out of the ground.

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