Saturday, 28 August 2010

Haworth

This is the main street in Haworth, still very olde-worlde and cobbled, although the village itself is far from being 'a museum'. It's a lively modern community, which cheerfully makes the most of the throngs of tourists who arrive at weekends. The steps on the right lead up to the church and the Parsonage behind. The pub (behind the phone box) is The Black Bull, famed as being one of the places Branwell Brontë frequented. Brother of the Brontë sisters, Branwell was an artist and writer. He held several different jobs but managed to be dismissed from all of them - one of them for having an affair with Mrs Robinson, his employer's wife. He died aged only 31, from drink and opium abuse.

I now have some more photos of Haworth and the surrounding moors on my other blog 'Seeking the Quiet Eye'.

11 comments:

  1. superb scene!! beautiful piece of history!!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Even with some modern addings, the village seems to have kept its charm. Cars don't seem to be allowed, which is great. I'd like to visit the Black Bull.. If only walls could talk!

    ReplyDelete
  3. So beautiful!

    About Branwell Bronte -- according to Douglas Adams (in his posthumous THE SALMON OF DOUBT) Branwell Bronte died standing up, leaning against a mantel, 'just to see if it could be done.'

    ReplyDelete
  4. What an incredibly beautiful shot. Love the phone booth.

    Darryl and Ruth : )

    ReplyDelete
  5. So lovely. I wonder what Charlotte, Jane, Anne and Branwell would make of it now though I'm sure they would recognise most of it. Wouldn't they?

    ReplyDelete
  6. Lovely shot and post. You asked if i kept fish when I catch them, and usually not. I like trout fresh, but most I like come from the ocean and it is far away. I catch so many I would grow gills if I kept them all. HA!Thank you for the lovely comments.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Lovely post of a place I am very fond of and have good memories of.If Haworth were a house I'd suggest it needs space clearing,despite all it has a heavy feel to it which is not 100% comfortable, to me anyway.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Von - I know just what you mean. It clings to the side of the valley with tenacity but somehow it retains that slightly 'dark' feeling, which I think has to do with its history. Although the Brontës died young (to our way of thinking), in the village average life expectancy at the time was only 25. 41% of children born there in the mid 19th-century died before the age of six!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Love the stone houses and the contrast to the phone box!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Ahh! One of my favorite towns! Have stayed nearby in recent years.

    ReplyDelete

No WV here but I've enabled comment moderation on older posts so I don't miss any of your messages. I love reading them - thank you! And thanks for visiting my blog.