Wednesday, 20 November 2013

Saltaire sunset


Sitting at my desk, I could see some enticing wisps of pink suddenly appearing above the roofs of the houses opposite. I grabbed my phone, ran to the end of the road and was rewarded with this lovely show of colour. You have to be quick to catch the sunsets round here and I rarely seem to see a good one. This wasn't the most spectacular but I am always charmed by the pretty effects. I think the iPhone did a creditable job of rendering it. I have not boosted the colour at all.

I'm going to take a break from blogging for a few weeks. I have a lot of other things I need to make progress with. I will be back, no doubt with a few Saltaire Christmas photos at some stage. Don't go away!!


Tuesday, 19 November 2013

Dales view


I wasn't going to post this one on my blog, though I've put it on Flickr.  A letterbox crop is the wrong shape for the blog really. But since I think it's probably one of my best landscape pictures EVER..... please view large (click on it). It's another view of Langstrothdale, such a scenic and unspoiled place.

Monday, 18 November 2013

Langstrothdale


Langstrothdale must be one of the most photogenic of the Yorkshire Dales. It's often the smaller dales that are the most stunning, wonderful for walking but less amenable to car travel as the roads are so narrow. The infant River Wharfe rises in this dale, heading south to the village of Cray, where its valley becomes Wharfedale.

Sunday, 17 November 2013

Rainbow over Langstrothdale


'Gratitude is the real treasure God wants us to find, because it isn't the pot of gold but the rainbow that colors our world.' Richelle E Goodrich

Saturday, 16 November 2013

Cauldron Falls


Recent heavy rain has made the waterfalls in the Yorkshire Dales rather spectacular. This pretty spot is Cauldron Falls in West Burton. It was sketched by J M Turner in 1816, when he was taking a grand tour of Yorkshire, and from the sketch (part of the Turner Bequest held in The Tate) it seems that little has changed since then. West Burton itself is an attractive Dales village, clustered around a large village green with a market cross.

Friday, 15 November 2013

Coat of Arms


There has been a church in Linton since Saxon times (850 AD) and the present church contains many ancient features such as a Norman font and arches. The church has been modified and extended several times, including a major Victorian restoration in 1861, which created the distinctive squat belfry with its carillon of four bells. I can't find much information about this coat of arms on the wall, but it makes an impressive feature. It relates to King George III. I believe that at one time churches had a statutory duty to display the royal coat of arms as a sign of loyalty to the crown and to the sovereign as Supreme Head of the Church of England.

Thursday, 14 November 2013

Linton Church


The little parish church of St Michael and All Angels sits beside the River Wharfe at Linton Falls, just across the river from the village of Grassington. To my mind it's one of the most picturesque places in Wharfedale. We were lucky enough to catch quite dramatic lighting, in between dodging the rain showers. Look closely and you will see this is a self-portrait too, shadows being unavoidable in the low sunlight. Me and my tripod!

There are estimated to be over 10,000 people buried in this churchyard and some of the memorial stones are fascinating. There is one for a two-year old boy who died of pneumonia in 1926, after playing Cupid (in the nude) in a pageant in Grassington.

Wednesday, 13 November 2013

Upper Wharfedale


Over the next few days I will post some of the photos I took during my holiday at Scargill in the Yorkshire Dales. This is the view across Upper Wharfedale from the track up to Buckden Pike, showing the typical landscape of this area with its drystone walls and limestone barns.

Tuesday, 12 November 2013

Through the triangular window....


It was raining at the time (!) but I think nevertheless you can see the impact of the glorious scenery viewed through one of the gable windows of Scargill House's chapel... Yorkshire drystone walling and lots of trees on this side, a view across the valley on the other.

I don't suppose many people will remember where my title comes from - did you ever watch 'Playschool'?  When my daughter was small, in the early 1980s, we often watched this children's TV programme. They zoomed in to a film sequence through a different-shaped window each time.

Monday, 11 November 2013

The chapel at Scargill House


I had another holiday! I spent a few days up in the Yorkshire Dales (Upper Wharfedale, to be precise) at Scargill House near Kettlewell. Scargill is a Christian holiday and retreat centre, home to a resident community of some thirty people from all over the world, who welcome all to enjoy a few days being well-cared for in a spectacular environment. The programme I went on was a photography holiday (what else!) so I spent time with a lovely group of like-minded folk, exploring some of the wonderful local beauty spots and being patiently coached where coaching was needed. I think I have finally got to grips with using a tripod, which had always frustrated me before. I'm not saying I will always lug one around with me; I like to travel light on my walks - but at least I now feel I can make proper use of one when I need to.

My photo shows the chapel at Scargill, recently short-listed in the top ten in a competition to find the best churches built in the last 60 years. Built in 1960 and designed by George Pace, the chapel has a soaring A-frame roof in a Scandinavian style. Through the huge, clear glass, gable windows you can see the lovely Yorkshire scenery outside, making it an especially uplifting place to worship the Creator God.

Sunday, 10 November 2013

Remembrance


'They shall not grow old, as we that are left grow old.
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.'

[From 'For the Fallen' by Laurence Binyon]

The East Window of St. Mary's Church, Kettlewell in the Yorkshire Dales shows the figure of Christ appearing to soldiers in the trenches at the Battle of the Somme, 1916. The window is a memorial to Lieutenant G. Cutliffe Hyne of the Irish Guards, who was wounded in the battle, aged just 18, and died of his wounds later in a military hospital in London. He was buried in St Mary's churchyard. The pile of clothes is his and the faces of the soldiers are reputedly those of his friends.

Saturday, 9 November 2013

Golden hour


'The golden hour' is very golden in Saltaire, when the low sunshine lights up the honey-coloured stone. This is the entrance to Salts Mill from Victoria Road.

Friday, 8 November 2013

Golden moment


'Every moment is a golden one for him who has the vision to recognise it as such.'  Henry Miller

(New Mill chimney, Saltaire, reflected in the Leeds-Liverpool Canal.)

Wednesday, 6 November 2013

Across the weir


New Mill, Saltaire. A familiar viewpoint in a different light.

Monday, 4 November 2013

Shadow play


Roberts Park bandstand, Saltaire. Even in the mid-afternoon now, the sun is getting low and the shadows are long. I waited a while to see if the youngsters would move out of the bandstand but the smooth surface is good for sliding their scooters and skateboards around. In the end, perhaps the rim-lit figures add something. I begin to think I may be a little too impatient to get people-free shots. Sometimes I might give the impression that Saltaire is uninhabited, which is far from the case!

Sunday, 3 November 2013

New England 5: Covered bridge


New England is famous for its covered bridges. Having read 'The Bridges of Madison County' and seen the movie, (yes, I know that's in Iowa), I have a romantic notion of them and was keen to see and photograph some. The limitations of a group tour meant that I wasn't able to see more than a couple and they were not the most authentic versions either, so I didn't really tick that box in the end. However, this pedestrian bridge in Stowe, Vermont was quite attractive. I feel sure it is there primarily as a tourist attraction; it looked relatively new.

Saturday, 2 November 2013

Autumn leaves


The Rowan or Mountain Ash tree has leaves that turn a nice shade of magenta in the autumn. Sadly, this year, they have not been able to stay on the trees for long due to the wind and rain we've had.  You have to look down to see the beauty now, not up.

Friday, 1 November 2013

Autumn windfall


There are more leaves on the ground than on some of our trees now - and yes, this is Autumn in Old England, not Fall in New England. (But with the occasional vivid red leaf among the yellow and brown ones, who would know?) Wind, rain and mild weather have combined to ensure that Britain's autumn this year is nowhere near as spectacular as last year's was. It is still possible to find some inspirational images though. This is just how the leaves fell, I didn't arrange them.

By the way, I have not finished with my USA trip photos yet, it's just taking me a while to work through them.