Saturday, 27 November 2010

Hebden Bridge


This photo shows quite clearly how the town of Hebden Bridge had to use the steep valley sides to sustain its rapid expansion in the 1880s & 90s.  This resulted in one of the town's most distinctive features: the "top and bottom house", an architectural curiosity virtually unique to the town.  These are four-storey houses that are effectively two houses built one on top of another.  The front door on one side leads into the lower house, made up of the bottom two floors of the building.  On the other side and higher up the hill is another front door accessing a separate house that is made up of the top two floors and the attic of the building.  You can see terraces of these in the photo above.  I think they cause the local postmen and delivery men a bit of confusion.

8 comments:

  1. Fascinating - first time I've heard of this kind of construction.

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  2. What an interesting architecture! and a clever way to use space!very unusual!

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  3. What a unique way to build! I guess they each have their own yard too.

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  4. It is a wonderful shot. The buildings built along the mountains are fascinating.

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  5. Hebden Bridge and no bridge to be seen. You had me confused for a minute. But then I read your post and all became clear :-)
    Fascinating.

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  6. So interesting Jenny and that is a beautiful shot of the hillside.

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  7. We once stayed in a cottage in Muker, Swaledale. It was three storey (all one house), but built into the side of the hill, so that all 3 storeys could be accessed from outside! Ground floor, front door to the road - middle floor, side door to a stepped path - top floor, back door to a mini garden. Brilliant :)

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  8. That's unique... like vertical townhouses...

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